eSAS | EARLY-STAGE ANESTHESIOLOGY SCHOLARS

Career Development

Eight tips for applying for your first grant

by Catherine Chen, MD While I don’t claim to be an expert in grantwriting, I have learned a thing or two over the past few years that may be helpful to those just starting out. I wrote my first successful grant application—a FAER Research Fellowship Grant—when I was a 2nd year anesthesia resident. More recently, I applied for and received a FAER Mentored Research Training Grant. Although both required a lot of blood, sweat, and tears (I’m exaggerating, but only a little), the second grant was definitely easier to write than the first. Why the difference between my two grantwriting experiences? With the second grant, I had a much better understanding of the writing process, timeline and what made up the different components of the grant. It also helped that some parts of the grant, such as ...

Picking A Research-Oriented Anesthesiology Residency

by Boris Heifets, MD PhD You’re finishing med school. You did a PhD, or spent serious time doing research. You are shocked how much you love anesthesiology (not quite what you expected a few years ago). Somewhat less shocking: you alone, among your peers, are going down this road instead of a research-track residency in medicine/peds/path. Can you really combine a career in science and anesthesiology? How do you even know which residencies to apply to? You need some help with this. Congratulations on navigating to the eSAS site! It’s true; you are looking for advice from a stranger on the Internet about one of the key decisions of your professional life. Well, I’m happy to help. Chances are we have something in common: I did an MD/PhD (neuroscience), was dead set on a career in neurology u...

NIDUS Seeking Proposals for $50,000 Pilot Grants!

The Network for Investigation of Delirium across the U.S. (NIDUS) is offering two $50,000 pilot grants for proposals related to delirium research. The purpose of these awards is to encourage innovative research that will advance investigation in delirium and lead to future grant funding. Applications are due on Tuesday, August 15, 2017, 5:00pm EST. Proposals must be related to delirium research in the following priority areas: Risk factors, prognosis, outcomes; Pathophysiology, mechanisms, biomarkers, genomics and other –‘omics’ approaches; Diagnostic tools and phenomenology; Clinical interventions for prevention and treatment. Two application tracks are available: junior investigator track and established investigator track. Open to U.S.-based and international researchers. Please visit o...

Scholars Program at IARS 2017!

Join your eSAS colleagues as well as IARS members from around the world for this exciting Scholar-targeted programming! Academic anesthesiology and medicine are struggling to adapt to a rapidly changing world, where opportunities abound but obstacles are plentiful. This uncertainty is exacerbated with diverse pressures facing young scholars and a lack of specific tools and encouragement to pursue original investigations along the translational continuum. Using innovative teaching approaches, scholars will find the much needed skills they desire while interacting with peers and mentors. This special program will have broad appeal, particularly to early stage scholars in anesthesiology. Also, be sure to attend the Scholars’ Program Reception on Saturday, May 6, from 5:00 pm to 6:00 pm, and p...

The NIH’s Loan-Repayment Program: An Overview

Imagine this: you’re a young physician, and like the rest of your peers, you have a significant amount of medical school debt.  Now add some debt to that from graduate school, and maybe even a growing family.  You’ve just completed a grueling residency, and you’re excited to get started with your physician scientist career.  But your classmates are taking private practice jobs that will pay them substantially more than the academic position you just accepted.  And as you start to add up the expenses that go along with this stage in your life, it hits you – how in the world are you going to pay off all of your debt as you start your career?  For most of us, this scenario isn’t hard to imagine; it’s actually a pretty good description of what is actually going on in our lives. Although many o...

Early Career Development Pearls of Wisdom

Early Career Development- Pearls of Wisdom (In no particular order) Courtesy of Robert N. Jamison, PhD, Brigham & Women’s Hospital J – Join societies and boards. Volunteer as a reviewer for professional journals and be a member of editorial boards. You learn a lot by reviewing others’ work. Join committees and society boards. It is important to get your name out there and be seen. A – Answer questions you may see in your practice. Recruit from the patients you see (no need for a lab for every question). M – Master your time. Take advantage of nonclinical time or missed patient appointments. Have projects you can jump to when there is any unexpected free time. I – Initiate contact with potential collaborators and mentors. Get to know those individuals...

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